Psychology

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Silence: A Relationship Killer

Over the many years that I’ve been practicing therapy, I’ve found that couples that are struggling in their relationships often succumb to the default mode of silence. Sometimes, it’s one person who defers to the unspoken, and at times it’s actually both. In either circumstance, such silence—not a healthy pause or meditative break—speaks to the absence of verbal and emotional intimacy. Unless we’re communicating on levels of extra sensory perception or body language, words are the only tools available to us to communicate let alone resolve our issues. There’s little sense to being in a relationship and resorting to silence. Not only does it sabotage the lifeline of a healthy coupling, it chokes your expressive needs.

Sex: The Love Limit

women's lips kissing

Can you max out on sex’s body benefits?
By Lauren F. Friedman

Regular sex (and its primary side effect, orgasm) brings serious health benefits: It can cure insomnia, relieve pain, and reduce the risk of cancer, heart disease, depression, Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, bladder problems, and more, research suggests. Its power stems mostly from its aerobic element and stress-relieving effects. “You can’t be worrying about a problem when you’re having an orgasm,” points out psychologist Laurie Mintz, author of A Tired Woman’s Guide to Passionate Sex.
If sex is a wonder drug, though, few researchers are working out the best dosage—the amount needed for maximum benefit. While large studies examining orgasms’ effects on mortality and health frequently find a linear relationship (more sex, better health, period), the research often deems two or more orgasms per week “frequent.” Might an upper limit exist, unnoticed at the extreme end of the scale?

– See more at: http://fguzzardi.blogspot.com.fgpost.net/2016/02/sex-love-limit.html#sthash.nvyUvYcj.dpuf

Sex: The Love Limit

women's lips kissing

Can you max out on sex’s body benefits?
By Lauren F. Friedman

Regular sex (and its primary side effect, orgasm) brings serious health benefits: It can cure insomnia, relieve pain, and reduce the risk of cancer, heart disease, depression, Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, bladder problems, and more, research suggests. Its power stems mostly from its aerobic element and stress-relieving effects. “You can’t be worrying about a problem when you’re having an orgasm,” points out psychologist Laurie Mintz, author of A Tired Woman’s Guide to Passionate Sex.
If sex is a wonder drug, though, few researchers are working out the best dosage—the amount needed for maximum benefit. While large studies examining orgasms’ effects on mortality and health frequently find a linear relationship (more sex, better health, period), the research often deems two or more orgasms per week “frequent.” Might an upper limit exist, unnoticed at the extreme end of the scale?

– See more at: http://fguzzardi.blogspot.com.fgpost.net/2016/02/sex-love-limit.html#sthash.nvyUvYcj.dpuf

The Science of Happiness

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